Bureau of Indian Affairs adopts ordinance with surety bond requirement

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On January 31st the Bureau of Indian Affairs published a notice of the adoption of the Snoqualmie Indian Tribe Liquor Control Ordinance. The Snoqualmie Tribe is made up of a group of Native American people, located in the Puget Sound area of Washington state. The Snoqualmie Tribe consists of approximately 650 members. This specific ordinance:

regulates and controls the possession, sale, and consumption of liquor within the Snoqualmie Indian Tribe’s Indian country. This ordinance allows for the possession and sale of alcoholic beverages within the jurisdiction of the Snoqualmie Indian Tribe, will increase the ability of the tribal government to control the distribution and possession of liquor within their jurisdiction, and at the same time, will provide an important source of revenue, the strengthening of the tribal government, and the delivery of tribal services.”

In order to execute all that the above excerpt mentions, the ordinance outlines general licensing requirements and processes to obtain the proper license to possess and distribute liquor, as well as taxation information and surety bonding requirements. Specific surety bonding requirements can be found in Section 7.0 of the ordinance, which concerns the Abatement of Nuisance:

“(a) Any room, house, building, vehicle, structure, or other place where liquor is sold, manufactured, bartered, exchanged, given away, furnished, or otherwise disposed of in violation of the provision of this ordinance or of any other Tribal law relating to the manufacture, importation, transportation, possession, distribution, and sale of liquor, and all property kept in and used in maintaining such place, is hereby declared to be a nuisance.

(b) The Chairperson of the Tribal Council shall, upon vote of the Tribal Council, institute and maintain an action in the name of the Tribe to abate and perpetually enjoin any nuisance declared under this section in the Snoqualmie Tribal Court. In addition to all other remedies at Tribal law, the Snoqualmie Tribal Court may also order the room, house, building, vehicle, structure, or place closed for a period of one (1) year or until the owner, lessee, tenant, or occupant thereof shall give bond of sufficient sum of not less than $25,000 payable to the Tribe and conditioned that liquor will not be thereafter manufactured, kept, sold, bartered, exchanged, given away, furnished, or otherwise disposed of thereof in violation of the provisions of this Ordinance or of any other applicable Tribal law and that he will pay all fines, costs and damages assessed against him for any violation of this Ordinance or other Tribal laws. If any conditions of the bond be violated, the bond may be recovered for the use of the Tribe.”

In the case of the Snoqualmie Tribe, the surety bond in discussion is required of any owner of an establishment that is found to be selling or manufacturing liquor in violation of the rules and regulations set forth by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Essentially, this bond prevents liquor establishments that have violated the Tribe’s liquor ordinance from having to close for one full year. The bond must posted in the amount of $25,000.

The experts at SuretyBonds.com are familiar with this new surety bond requirement in Washington state and are ready to assist you with all of your bonding needs. If you have questions or are ready to purchase your bond, give us a call at 1 (800) 308-4358 or submit an online bond request. Our expert surety specialists will you walk you through each step of our fast, easy and accurate bonding process.

Missouri implements surety bond requirement for scholarship program

SuretyBonds.com offers the SuretyBonds.com Small Business Success Student Scholarship Program annually. Here's CEO, Josh Kayser, and 2013 winner, Heather Nicholson.

SuretyBonds.com offers the SuretyBonds.com Small Business Success Student Scholarship Program annually. Here’s CEO, Josh Kayser, and 2013 winner, Heather Nicholson.

On April 4th, the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education adopted regulations that enforce a new law enacted under Senate Bill 17, which was passed in 2013. The new law creates a scholarship and tax credit program for students with special needs. The newly adopted regulations govern scholarship granting organizations within the state and set forth the the licensing requirements and process to become a legally operating charitable organization.

The complete Code of State Regulations governing scholarship granting organizations can be found here.

Among the many new regulations is the requirement of scholarship granting organizations, who are willing to receive more than $50,000 in donations each year, to demonstrate financial viability by filing the following documents with the Department:

“(A) A surety bond payable to the state in an amount equal to the aggregate amount of contributions expected to be received during the school year; or

(B) Financial information that demonstrates the financial viability of the scholarship granting organizations including financial statements…”

The surety bond mentioned in the Code of State Regulations is to be posted with the Department of Economic Development in a minimum amount of $50,000.

The due date for filing your application to become a scholarship granting organization in Missouri is the November, 1 year prior to the school year in which you wish to grant scholarships. If you want to file an application, an online version can be found here.

The experts at SuretyBonds.com are familiar with this new surety bond requirement in Missouri and are ready to assist you with all of your bonding needs. If you have questions or are ready to purchase your bond, give us a call at 1 (800) 308-4358 or submit an online bond request. Our expert surety specialists will you walk you through each step of our fast, easy and accurate bonding process.

Nevada introduces new bond requirement for document preparation service providers

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Effective March 1, 2014, the Nevada Secretary of State implemented new regulations governing document preparation service providers and the process to become certified in the state. The official definition of a document preparation service provider according to the state is:

“A person who:

For compensation and at the direction of a client, provides assistance to the client in a legal matter, including, without limitation: (1) Preparing or completing any pleading, application or other document for the client; (2) Translating an answer to a question posed in such a document; (3) Securing any supporting document, such as a birth certificate, required in connection with the legal matter; or (4) Submitting a completed document on behalf of the client to a court or administrative agency.”

Among the new regulations for document preparation service providers is a change to the requirements for licensing. The process now requires the posting of a surety bond in the penal sum of $50,000. This bond is to be filed with the Secretary of State and is conditioned to provide protection to clients of document preparation service providers.

For more information regarding these new requirements, click here.

The experts at SuretyBonds.com are familiar with this new surety bond requirement in Nevada and are ready to assist you with all your document preparation service provider bonding needs. If you have questions or are ready to purchase your bond, give us a call at 1 (800) 308-4358 Mondays through Thursdays between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. CST or between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. CST on Fridays. Or, you can submit an instant online bond request 24/7. Our expert surety specialists will you walk you through each step of our fast, easy and accurate bonding process.

Nebraska revises surety bond requirements for oil and natural gas drilling

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On June 10, 2014, the Governor’s Office of the state of Nebraska signed revised regulations pertaining to oil and gas drilling into law. The revised regulations, proposed by the Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, increase surety bonding amounts for the drilling of oil and gas wells.

Past regulations required the posting of a $5,000 bond for each well or hole to be drilled. The newly-passed regulations increase said bond amount to $10,000 per well or hole. This bonding requirement is set to guarantee the well owner’s compliance with all of the rules and regulations enforced by the Commission regarding drilling in the state. The bond remains in effect until either the well is plugged, a new bond is filed by a well’s successor or the bond is released by the Director of the Commission.

In addition to the individual well bonding option, the Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission allows for a blanket bond option for those wishing to bond multiple wells at once. An excerpt from the Rules and Regulations of the Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission regarding blanket bonds can be found below:

“It is provided, however, that any owner in lieu of such bond may file with the Director a good and sufficient blanket bond in the principal sum of not less than one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) covering all wells or holes drilling or to be drilled in the State of Nebraska by the principal in said bond; and upon acceptance and approval by the Director of such blanket bond, said bond shall be considered as compliance with the foregoing provisions requiring an individual well or hole bond. The Director may refuse to accept a bond or add wells to a blanket bond if the operator or surety company has failed in the past to comply with statutes, rules or orders relating to the operation of wells; or for other good cause.”

The experts at SuretyBonds.com are familiar with these updated  requirements in Nebraska and are ready to assist you with all your oil and natural gas bonding needs. If you have questions or are ready to purchase your bond, give us a call at 1 (800) 308-4358 Mondays through Thursdays between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. CST or between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. CST on Fridays. Or, you can submit an instant online bond request 24/7. Our expert surety specialists will you walk you through each step of our fast, easy and accurate bonding process.

Kansas updates bond requirements for sporting event promoters

On February 21st, 2014, the Kansas Department of Administration approved a revision to the state’s regulations for sporting event promoters. The revision to the existing regulations was made by the Kansas Athletic Commission, which oversees laws and enforces regulations that govern regulated sports such as professional boxing, kickboxing, mixed martial arts and wrestling. Licensing requirements for event promoters fall within the jurisdiction of the Commission’s sporting event regulations.

The licensing process had previous required promoters to post a surety bond or letter of credit before they could be granted an event permit. The surety bond ensured the payment of fees and taxes owed to the Commission. The revised regulations state that the licensing process will continue to require a surety bond, but at a minimum amount of $10,000. An additional bond my be required by the Commission if the original bond will not provide sufficient liability protection to all parties. According to K.A.R. 128-2-13, the bond will now be used to secure the payment of fees due to the Commission, plus any unpaid feeds owed to officials and contestants. The revised regulations also eliminated the option to post a letter of credit as an alternative.

The experts at SuretyBonds.com are ready to assist you with all of your Kansas sporting event bonding needs. If you have questions or are ready to purchase your bond, give us a call at 1 (800) 308-4358 Mondays through Thursdays between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. CST or between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. CST on Fridays. Or, you can submit an instant online bond request here 24/7. Our expert surety specialists can walk you through each step of the Kansas event promoter bonding process.

These approved revisions to the regulations for sporting event promoters in Kansas are currently being enforced. Individuals may apply for a promoter license with the Kansas Athletic Commission online here.